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Rude Food

Super foods

A photo of some super foods

These six natural foods are indeed super, and available in your local Irish health store. Check out what they can do for you


Seaweed
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Growing naturally on Irish coasts, in particular the west and north-west, one of the best known seaweeds is Dulse or Dillisk. Others include sea lettuce, bladderwrack, kombu or kelp, wakame and Carrageen moss.
Who is it good for?
Those who want to detox their diet, as seaweed has detoxing properties.
Dulse is also good for maintaining thyroid gland health as it’s a natural source of iodine. “Kelp is nature’s richest natural source of Iodine, making it a great weight management aid,” says Ria Jones of Sea of Vitality. “Dillisk or dulse is a rich source of vitamin B12, iron and protein plus magnesium and calcium.”
How can it be used?
Most Irish seaweed is sold in dried form. It can be soaked in water and added to pies, soups, salads and stir fries, or baked in breads and muffins.

Medicinal mushrooms
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There are literally thousands of edible mushrooms, but the best known used in supplements include chaga, reishi, cordyceps, shiitake and maitake.
Who is it good for?
Lots of people. Medicinal mushrooms have different benefits from energy-boosting to stress-reducing, they have antibacterial and antiviral properties, are good for hormone balancing, increasing immunity and can help with lowering blood sugar. They are also high in vitamin D and antioxidants.
How can it be used?
Take as a liquid or powdered supplement, or drink mushroom teas available in instant sachets.

Camu camu
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Camu camu is a bush that grows in the rainforest in Peru and Brazil with green or purply red berries and white pulp.
Who is it good for?
Anyone who wants to keep their skin looking young. “Camu camu is probably the most powerful natural source of vitamin C on the planet,” says Finn Murray of the Hopsack in Rathmines, Dublin. “Less than 1 teaspoon can provide 1000mg, and it remains active in the body for much longer than synthetic ascorbic acid. For nervous system, immunity and all round antioxidant capacity, camu camu packs a powerful punch.”
How can it be used?
Sprinkle camu camu powder on your porridge or cereal or add to a juice. “The great joy of camu camu is that in its powder form it tastes good!” according to Finn Murray. “No need to pull in any flavour masking companions here.”

Goji berries
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Goji berries grow on a shrub in parts of the Himalayas, China and Mongolia. They look like dried red raisins.
Who is it good for?
The over-55s who want to help maintain good eye health, because Goji berries are packed with macular-supportive antioxidants including beta-carotene and zeaxanthin. Goji berries are also thought to boost immune function, protect the liver and improve circulation. According to nutritional therapist Helen Corrigan based in Nourish in Dublin’s Wicklow St. “Goji berries are considered nature’s most powerful anti-ageing food.”
How can it be used?
“Goji berries are a delicious addition to salads, smoothies or a mixture of other dried fruit, nuts, seeds and other superfoods,” says Helen Corrigan. “Aim for a handful a day to get the maximum benefit.”

Chlorella
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Chlorella is a single cell green algae.
Who is it good for?
Everyone. Chlorella boosts immunity and promotes overall health. “Chlorella is particularly well known for its excellent detoxification of substances such as alcohol and heavy metals from the body,” says Helen Corrigan. “It provides a high level of good fats, protein, vitamins and minerals.” It is also an excellent source of antioxidants such as carotenoids, folic acid and a rich source of nucleic acids, needed for cell regeneration.
How can it be used?
Add chlorella powder to a breakfast smoothie. “Shoppers need to make sure they pick a good, organically certified source of chlorella, as it’s known to drawn in compounds from its environment,” says Finn Murray. “Also, cracked cell wall chlorella is known to be more effective as it releases its benefits to the body more readily.”

Maca
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Maca is a root plant called lepedium meyenii that grows in the high Andes of Peru.
Who is it good for?
Women who want to support their fertility – or those experiencing the menopause. “Maca is a fantastic superfood for energy and fertility particularly,” says Helen Corrigan. “As an adrenal tonic and hormone balancer, maca is unsurpassed,” says Finn Murray, “it combines excellently with other adaptogenic herbs such as rhodiola and holy basil as a powerful rejuvenating tonic for a stressed and overworked system.”
How can it be used?
“While you can get it in capsule form, I’d recommend adding the powdered form into a smoothie or combining with cacao for a tasty raw chocolate dessert with an energy kick,” says Helen Corrigan.

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